Hite: In Northwest Ohio, Wind Is Our Shale
A Letter to the Editor by State Senator Cliff Hite
August 17, 2017
 
[ Cliff Hite Home | Cliff Hite Press ]
 
 

On my desk in the Ohio Statehouse, a single picture of my four beautiful granddaughters is a daily reminder of what we are trying to accomplish here in the General Assembly. As tough as it is at times, the only thing that pulls me away from spending time with those smiling faces is the understanding that the decisions I make here are right for my constituents in Northwest Ohio, and that we are creating a climate for economic development, are moving our state forward, and ensuring our children and grandchildren have boundless opportunity and a bright future ahead of them.

It saddens me that at this very moment, overreaching wind turbine setback laws are preventing just that. They have halted a tremendous economic development effort that is estimated to bring jobs and a $4.2 billion wind industry to an area that has not been able to reap the benefits of Ohio’s shale boom. Many parts of the state have neither the interest nor ability to generate significant amounts of energy using wind. That is fine--and they are pursuing economic development by other means. However, in my district, wind is our shale. And every day that goes by with this arbitrary setbacks rule in place is another missed opportunity to get this industry back on track for Northwest Ohio.

Wind energy development can have a rippling economic effect, too. Corporate purchasers such as Amazon, manufacturers like Timken, and state and local government treasuries all stand to benefit from these wind projects, incentivizing more and more business investment in our area. Northwest Ohio is an ideal region for this viable and renewable energy source. The current setback laws are bad for business, the environment, and our families.

My goal when I joined the legislature was to leave Ohio a better place than when I started. I strongly believe the development of these wind farms will benefit our state for generations to come. New projects are eagerly waiting for us to fix this problem we created in Ohio law. I sincerely hope as a legislature we are prepared to do so.

 
 
 
  
Featured Posts

Senator Cliff Hite Introduces Legislation To Fix Ohio's Wind Setback Policy

 

“The current policy is contrary to Ohio’s reputation as a business-friendly environment and an energy-producing state,” said Sen. Hite. “It prevents businesses with an interest in gaining access to and investing in wind energy in Ohio from doing so.”



 
 

Hite: In Northwest Ohio, Wind Is Our Shale

 

It saddens me that at this very moment, overreaching wind turbine setback laws are preventing just that. They have halted a tremendous economic development effort that is estimated to bring jobs and a $4.2 billion wind industry to an area that has not been able to reap the benefits of Ohio’s shale boom. Many parts of the state have neither the interest nor ability to generate significant amounts of energy using wind. That is fine--and they are pursuing economic development by other means. However, in my district, wind is our shale. And every day that goes by with this arbitrary setbacks rule in place is another missed opportunity to get this industry back on track for Northwest Ohio.



 
 

Senators Join The Governor For Signing Of Senate Bill To Ensure Safe Drinking Water For All Ohioans

 

"I appreciate the input received from the agriculture and environmental communities, as well as local governments, in helping to develop this important piece of legislation,"



 
 

Hite Touts Budget Investing In Schools, Rural Jobs And Lifting The Tax Burden For Ohio's Family Farmers

 

“Even with a tight revenue stream to work with, minimal schools will receive cuts, and many schools are actually receiving funding increases,” said Hite. “As the chairman of the Finance Subcommittee on Primary-Secondary Education, we heard almost 20 hours of testimony from local education leaders. The fact is, despite some tough decisions, this budget maintained historic levels of state aid investments in our K-12 education and made an additional investment of $274 million over the biennium. That is something to be proud of.”