COLUMBUS - 

State Senator Gayle Manning (R-North Ridgeville) this week announced Senate passage of legislation strengthening punishments for the abuse of animals in Ohio.

House Bill 60, commonly known as Goddard's Law, prohibits acts of cruelty against companion animals and includes penalties for intentionally killing a police dog.

"This bill aligns Ohio with the majority of other states when it comes to animal cruelty laws," said Manning. "As animal abusers have a higher potential to perform violent acts toward people, this bill not only prevents cruelty against animals but helps us protect our children and families."

The legislation was named Goddard's Law in honor of northeast Ohio weatherman Dick Goddard, who passionately advocated for strengthening the state's animal abuse penalties. 

 
 
 
  
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